Aerial Photography

No. A photographic enlargement only appears to show more detail than a 9-by-9 inch photograph. Photographic resolution (or image resolution) deteriorates with each enlargement factor.
Each National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP) frame covers a 5-by-5 mile area at 1:40,000 scale. Each National High Altitude Photography (NHAP) color infrared (CIR) frame covers an 8-by-8 mile area at 1:58,000 scale.
Yes, customers will need to acquire at least 2 consecutive digital images from the same roll and then create transparencies or contact prints to view them with a stereoscope.
The public may download digital aerial photography products at no cost from the Earth Resources Observation
The aerial photographs date as far back as the 1940's for the United States and its territories. Availability of specific coverage, film type, and acquisition dates vary from agency to agency.
Color-infrared (CIR) aerial photography - often called false color photography because it renders the scene in other than the normal colors seen by the human eye - is widely used for interpretation of natural resources.
Focal length is the distance from the middle of the camera lens to the focal plane (i.e. the film). As focal length increases, image distortion decreases. The focal length is precisely measured when the camera is calibrated.
The National High Altitude Photography (NHAP) program was initiated in 1980 and coordinated by the U.S.
Simply defined, scale can be expressed as the ratio or proportion between a distance on the aerial photographs (or maps) and the actual distance on the ground or land surface.
The majority of USGS aircraft photography is used for cartographic purposes. Image distortion is minimized when photographs are acquired looking straight down or vertically.