Bats White-Nose Syndrome

Thousands of people have visited affected caves and mines since White-nose Syndrome (WNS) was first observed, and there have been no reported human illnesses attributable to WNS.
Scientists believe that White-nose Syndrome (WNS) is transmitted primarily from bat to bat. There is a strong possibility that it may also be transmitted by humans inadvertently carrying the fungus from cave to cave on their clothing and gear.
White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emergent disease of hibernating bats that has spread from the northeastern to the central United States at an alarming rate.
In response to White-nose Syndrome (WNS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the states request that cavers observe all cave closures and advisories, and avoid caves, mines or passages containing hibernating bats to minimize disturbance to them.
Contact your state wildlife agency, file an electronic report in those states that offer this service, e-mail U.S.
White-nose Syndrome (WNS) mostly affects hibernating bats. More than half of the 47 bat species living in the United States and Canada hibernate to survive the winter.