Energy

Gas hydrates can be studied in the laboratory, where a machine is used to create the proper pressure and temperature conditions for hydrate formation, or it can be studied in situ using seismic data collected aboard ships and geophysical models.
According to the USGS assessment, the Marcellus Shale contains about 84 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered, technically recoverable natural gas and 3.4 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable natural gas liquids.
The USGS does not maintain statistics on oil production or oil consumption.
“Technically recoverable” means that the oil and/or gas can be produced using currently available technology and industry practices. This is regardless of any economic or accessibility considerations.
Gas hydrates are a crystalline solid formed of water and gas.
Traditional oil fields extract oil from rocks with relatively high porosity and permeability, so the oil flows out fairly easily.
The USGS uses a statistically-based process to calculate the likely range of its estimate. The range of values extends from a 5% or greater likelihood of occurrence (the F5 value, or largest estimated value) to less than 95% likelihood of occ
The USGS provides estimates of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources that have yet to be found (drilled), but if found, could be produced using currently available technology and indu